Monday, March 3, 2014

LIFE

LIFE

When I was young I thought the only important thing in life was to get out of school. To be 16 so I could drive. To be 21 so I could drink and party. I did not have a care in the world.

When I ventured into the business world I wanted to win, accomplish, and reach a goal. I wanted to dream and make things happen. To get there, I was always in a hurry.

I think we all try to do things in a unique way. Win or lose we all make mistakes and miss what is important in life. We forget to slow down and take much for granted.

My neighbor is a young man. On Christmas day, he suffered a massive heart attack. He started to recover and then went into cardiac arrest. His heart failed. His body was strong and young, so he became a candidate for an artificial heart. He was too weak for a heart transplant and it would also take too long to find a donor heart – so the artificial heart replaced the one that died.

It was only a couple of years ago they thought it quite impossible to survive with an artificial heart, but that has changed. One of the first films I directed had Paul Winchell as one of my stars. Paul was a very funny man. Known as one of the world’s best ventriloquists, his constant companion was Jerry Mahoney. They entertained fans all over the world. He was also a fine actor, very funny comedian, humanitarian and little known inventor. He was the host of The Paul Winchell Show and hosted the Winchell-Mahoney Time – a children’s TV series. During the filming of my film “The Man From Clover Grove” Paul shared with me and many cast members, Ron Masak, Cheryl Miller, Rose Marie, Richard Deacon, Buddy Lester, Jed Allen, Stu Gilliam and Joe Higgins, news about some of his inventions. The one he was most proud of because he had some medical training earlier was his artificial heart. He was the first person to build and patent a mechanical artificial heart implantable in the chest cavity. He held the U.S. Patent for the device. He said one-day man would be able to take a worn out heart and replace it with a mechanical one. We laughed and enjoyed the almost eerie idea that a man’s heart could be replace with something mechanical.

The best part of that story is it has happened. Paul must be smiling down at mankind for taking the serious invention of a comedian and turning it into a functioning device that saves lives. My neighbor is healing and will be waiting for a donor heart. The remarkable new device is, miraculously keeping him alive.

That made me curious what people thought were the 10 most important things in the world. I often ask people what they think is important in life. I’m often staggered by some of the answers I get. Some people take their time, think the question over and then say one of the following. The answers, not in any particular order, always include:
 (1) The Grand Canyon
 (2) The Pyramids in Egypt
 (3) The Great Wall of China
 (4) The Taj Mahal in India
 (5) Russian Architecture
 (6) The Panama Canal,
 7) St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City
 (8) The Towering Skyscrapers in Dubai the City in the United Arab Emirate
 (9) Man Landing on the Moon
 (10) Television or the Internet

As a man who loves to entertain and has spent his entire life creating works of art people all over the world can enjoy, I have my own views on what is important to my life. My list is quite different from most. It is short and to the point. The 10 most important things to me are:
1.              The SEE and have the vision to appreciate.
2.              To HEAR the rich sounds of life, nature and friends.
3.              To TOUCH and enjoy the ability and sensation which moves the heart.
4.              To TASTE the glorious buds that surround the palate.
5.              To FEEL the sensation that moves the heart, the physical, and the mind.
6.              To Laugh and entertain both inside the body and out.
7.              To LOVE and be able to understand and appreciate the emotions.
8.              To HUG and share within the warmth of giving.
9.              To LISTEN and learn the art of knowing what others are saying.
10.            To LEARN by taking all that has enlightened the mind and mold it into wonderful.

I feel that if everyone took the time to appreciate what was gifted to them and not what others have done, life would be as special as first intended. To accept those who may be different, scarred, limbless or unique and welcome them into your life as anyone else would be. If we all carried a peaceful heart so much more, could be accomplished. Life after all is a gift. It can end on a moments notice without warning. What a shame to waste such a unique opportunity to make a statement others would remember having been said.

I remember my grandfather telling me to slow down and smell the roses. I thought that was a joke. Who went around smelling roses? I adored my grandfather but sadly it took years to understand what his simple statement meant. He also said, “Do with others as you do with family.” Grandpa was the ultimate teacher of what listening, learning and smiling meant to the body and mind. It was a given. If we first learned to listen, our smile would come much easier.

Life. It is what we make it. We have choices. We create and build the bodies and minds. We can travel down any road we chose. Some may be far more difficult than others, but it is our choice and no one ever said life would be easy. It is up to us to make it easy … so we can enjoy every moment. An angry heart will never grow fonder until it change directions.

People laugh when I suggest a smile instead of a frown, but a rich smile has a wonderful habit of making us feel better. When you share a smile, invariably you get one back in return.

Life is good and worth sharing.

William Byron Hillman © 2014
My next film:
Of Light and Darkness
Web announcements coming soon
And
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure
Book Links:
Veronique and Murray: http://tinyurl.com/8xrmmu7
Zebra’s Rock and Me http://tinyurl.com/7b28qu6
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ANVNQ6G
In development Veronique and Murray’s Honeymoon
Rollie Kemp Books
Ghosts and Phantoms Part I: http://tinyurl.com/6wxef7g
Ghosts and Phantoms Part II: http://tinyurl.com/d7mtspu

In editorial – Prematurely Terminated

Thursday, January 2, 2014

REFLECTIONS

REFLECTIONS:

Like a silk sheet floating over smooth lake water, 2013 passed away and in comes a New Year we must now refer to as 2014. We’ll surely forget to write that date on new checks and letters for a while, but soon it will become the norm.

Looking back, if one were to create a list of what has changed it might amaze quite a few. We are slowly discovering things that once bothered us no longer do. Items we despised thinking about are not all that bad. Some might even say we have become anesthetized as a society because we no longer care about much of anything.

We have mastered the art of giving criticism but fail to stop long enough to examine things. We want changes, some demand them while others like the way things were. The winners of course create change and then people stop to take a look. No, that was not what they wanted, but it is too late. The changes became law.

We are so busy trying to make things work or blend together we no longer pay attention to the news, the rules, laws or important things that improve lifestyle.

I watched a couple of television shows where the comedian went out on the street to ask a few questions from people on the street. He was not picky he only chose folks from all walks of life. It is what he asked and the answers he received that opened my eyes. The people came from every walk in life meaning some were young and some much older. Some were White, Black, and Hispanic, from the Middle East and Asia. He did a good job of selecting a variety of outlooks and opinions. What he did not get were answers. He discovered the majority were functioning brain-dead bodies. The majority just walked through life without a thought in the world. Few knew anything about history or education or the news. He was asking questions to dead people who somehow were still functioning as living creatures. Some had no idea who ran the country or what their jobs were. A few people thought politicians were actors, newsmen or women. It became apparent almost all had limited knowledge about the country where they lived. Additional insults came when a few openly voiced opinions about the laws being stupid and unacceptable.

While he cleverly asked the questions, the answers were quite serious. Most do not like the idea of working and would rather get free things. Free was the word of the day. Many thought it was cool for others to pay for their education, phones and transportation. Most knew nothing about the stock market, banking or other questions I thought everyone knew. It wasn’t a test because he was just asking questions about life in general.

We all seem to hate taxes but are clueless to all the new hidden taxes. No one cares what the tax money might be used for it is just another tax. They now tax wine, beer, liquor, fishing rods, camping goods, clothes, and many other items. Sadly only the observant understand there are additional taxes added separately. Most stores just build the tax into the receipt or hide it. Some dare to expose it and still we miss it until the one responsible for paying the bills notices these new added on expenses.

It’s like Social Security. When my father was young, and I too was young, the government said Social Security was a savings account for when we got older. The government figured out few of its citizens saved much or nothing at all during the great depression. The Government decided they would save our money for us. It was safe and backed by the government. We had money taken out of each check. It was mandatory. They took it even when people disagreed with them. I believe they are still doing this. It had always been a safety net. When we got too old to work, we had this savings account waiting for us. It was safe, protected and backed up by the government like a pension plan. We believed it. Then along came this fellow by the name of Johnson. He was the President at the time. He took a look at all that money and decided to borrow it. He said they would pay it back. Without taking a vote or asking public opinion, the government chose to take the money and then spent it on other stuff. Poof, with the signing of a pen the trillion-dollar Social Security account vanished. They started using other’s money to pay for the older folks retiring. They said the program was now broke or would be in a few years. They changed the name and now refer to it as an “entitlement.”  The government stole the mandatory savings account. This was the citizens money thought to be tucked safely away and backed by the government. Those who operated the program could not figure out how to pay it back. It was too late. Oops. They got together and changed the title. Presently referred to as an "entitlement" the mandatory savings account every law-abiding citizen contributed into is no more. It is as though we are now all brain dead and would not notice. It is like a thief stealing your things and then selling them back to make the innocent feel guilty for making their lifelong contribution. They forgot they took the money to create an entitlement called Medicare and Medicaid both of which received their initial funds from Social Security money.

Of course, a divided country exists, but most do not know why or if they agree or disagree with either side. It is easier to complain until an unwanted change comes along that makes us mad.

It is easy to blame one party or the other if people behave reasonably. It may be unthinkable to rationalize both parties and independents are equally guilty of one thing or another. We vote people in because we like how they talk. Some politicians just look nice, or they are intelligent sounding. Some share great ideas that will never become a factor once they get into office. We vote for some because they are liberal or conservative. Most of the time the public does not have a clue who these people are? Are they honest? When voted into public service would they do the job as promised in the election?  Does the population care? Many vote straight down party lines without giving one thought on whom they are voting for. The man or woman could be a crook, liar or cheat. It does not’ matter because he or she is a democrat or republican and thus deserves my vote.

Of course, we do not talk about politics with friends and neighbors because the conversation always ends badly. That way, later on when the ones voted for fails, people can avoid saying they voted for them.

Looking at the whole, I realized we avoid voting the best person into office, instead we vote for the party and then blame them when things go wrong. When we look back, we realize this dreadful habit started a long time ago. There was a time we looked at each candidate closely and then picked the one who looked trustful and honest and would do the best job for us.

As a whole, are we better than the year before? Did all the things we hoped for happen? Has racial feelings changed? Do we like each other more? Do we have better jobs? Are the ethnics groups thriving? Have we improved the global outlook of the country we live? Have we made new friends, sought peace and opened communications everywhere? Have we improved the air we breathe? Did we help nations in need? Did we give and receive equal parts?

There will always be problems, disagreements and compromises. Are we doing the best we cab to improve these areas? Is it the fault of Congress or is it the Senate? It has to be someone’s fault, and we’d never admit it if we put the wrong person in the office.

The New Year brings hope, just like every New Year from the past. The bigger question is can we do what needs to be done so all of mankind can live a better life?

We make New Years Resolutions and keep them for a few days or a month. Then we forget about the resolutions just like politicians do on their way to the office. Why make a resolution if we know we’ll break it? If we need to lose a few pounds will we do it or just forget about the promise? Will be stop drinking or smoking or eat less chocolate?

If only we could slow down. If only we examined things before doing them. When was the last time we stopped to help a stranger, get an animal out of the road or assist a person with a handicap do something they can not do for themselves?

Have you ever thanked a policeman, fireman, or person serving in the military? When traveling, do we thank the pilot, the person checking your I.D. or the taxi driver? What about saying a kind word to someone serving their country and at the same time protecting all of us while visiting?

We’re in a hurry. We’re guilty of not doing many things we should be doing every day. When opening the eyes each morning, that is the moment to be grateful. When was the last time you said, “thank you” out loud for just being alive?

Reflecting over one year is fun and dangerous. Fun because we enjoy e a good time and take the fun over everything else. Dangerous because we understand all the things we could have done but skipped because being in a hurry was more important. The common excuse explained that there was no time, when in truth there was plenty of time. We have regrets. We carry guilt everywhere.  The chest wounds go deep and hide the pain of frustration. We forget the little things and take lots for granted. If we dare reflect over a few years, we get frustrated. We realize we could have easily avoided much of what we despise in life. To deal with things we should have taken a little more time to check them out.

Life is beautiful once we learn to live it. The journey can be a rough ride because of the choices made but if thought out would most likely have a different result. Endings are what we make them be and by nature complain when they do not work as planned.

Time just flows through the fingers like sand at the beach. It does not return. There are no makeovers and nothing that has passed on will come back for seconds. If we dare to live recklessly, we can expect a reckless outcome. We are what exclusively make us unique. We hear our own symphony and no one can take it away or improve it except us.

Let’s reflect together. With some effort, we can make mankind better for all. Let’s make 2014 special and help it work for many instead of only a few.

William Byron Hillman © 2014
My next film:
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure
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Book Links:
Veronique and Murray: http://tinyurl.com/8xrmmu7
Zebra’s Rock and Me http://tinyurl.com/7b28qu6
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ANVNQ6G
In development Veronique and Murray’s Honeymoon

Rollie Kemp Books
Ghosts and Phantoms Part I: http://tinyurl.com/6wxef7g
Ghosts and Phantoms Part II: http://tinyurl.com/d7mtspu
In editorial – Prematurely Terminated

Monday, November 11, 2013

DON'T ASK DON'T TELL

DON’T ASK DON’T TELL

To many this has only one meaning but to me it has broad and eventful consequences. So many of us forget to ask, afraid of what we might hear and of course we never tell for fear of ridicule.

When was the last time you asked your wife, child, neighbor, friend or co-worker how they were and really meant it? Many of us have little or no idea what needs may be silently begged for and yet go unheard. Do we know what makes all those in and around our lives tick, smile, or fear? No, that’s the answer.

Wives become that woman who does, but inside may have a siren screaming for attention that goes unnoticed. It can be so simple, a warm meaningful hug could be all that is needed and yet missed.

Children grow up so fast, they are known to form their own ideas, most of which remain known only to them. Children fear being made fun of or laughed at. They are, after all, just children. What do they know?

Neighbors are those people who live next door or down the block. You wave or smile at neighbors but have little in common with them. Going out of your way can be painful. Can you remember the last time you asked a neighbor how they were? Have you ever asked a person living down the block if they needed anything or could use a shoulder to lean on? No, the answer is probably not.

Co-workers are people who fulfill duties, come and go and have little connection with anyone unless they get fired or their time is cut. In anger, we usually find answers to questions we didn't want to ask. For many who hope issues will just go away, their silence is not an easy way to avoid problems. Sadly, in many cases it doesn’t.

So much of our misery could be avoided if we spent a little time to explore things before we dove in and asked a few simple questions that might offend or create an argument. If we asked with sincerity, lives could change, and sad end results could be altered. We don’t ask because we don’t want to take the time required to follow through and do it in an honest and heartfelt way. We are afraid what is heard might take longer to deal with or solve or, God forbid, requires more time and we don’t want to part with our precious time, so ultimately we don’t ask.

It’s a bit scary when you wonder how many men don’t really know their wives or girlfriends. At times, men have no real idea what makes their mates inner engine purr. It takes both men and women years to realize the opposite sex is different inside and out. The discrepancy goes much deeper than sex, sports or leisure activities. The unknown in many cases is deep and even terrifying, and why few dare to explore. Sometimes its just easier to separate than deal with unknown issues that if talked out, questions asked, and secrets shared could alter both lives in unexpected and totally fulfilled ways. Few ask or tell and thats too bad.

Working with children is always a difficult task. Even when best efforts are used it can backfire and make matters worse. Without having an abundance of patience, you can expect failure to raise its ugly head. Few mothers and fathers really get to know their children. The little tykes are babies one minute and teenagers the next. They sprout unexpectedly, grow out of their clothes too fast, and before you know it they suddenly have adult type opinions of things you didn’t even think they knew about. Some children even have to audacity to explore a different faith than yours, disagree with their families in-house politics and change views on just about everything that started within the safety of their initial four walls. Kids can be difficult, moody, argumentative, and even downright ornery. They may use drugs, start smoking, or become loose with their sexuality. Many do this quietly and totally without guidance. Many parents are clueless and shocked when a discovery is made. Some parents are so afraid to hear the reasons for such rebellion they refuse to acknowledge it exists and choose to look the other way.

Have you ever asked why? The answer is basically easy, no one asks questions or listens to answers. Many parents watch from arms length while their children grew up right under their nose. No one dared to quiz or inquire about issues mostly hidden from plain sight. Things we accuse children of doing are for the most part, not in their thoughts but are, for whatever reason, in ours. Had we had enough curiosity to trust, ask important questions and know what our children thought about things it might change everything. To open dialogue is tough for many. Sometimes it takes lots of patience, something we don’t want to part with. Some actually believe it’s easier to avoid asking children uncomfortable questions, and allow things to happen as they do. Again too many wait until their children grow up and become adults. Sadly many do this and in most cases it's too late to make a difference. Kids automatically grow up believing parents are against them and everything they stand for. Some kids don’t have a clue what they stand for, so they follow others. If we expect them to tell us all about it, we’re dreaming.

When things are shared, things we don’t want to hear or deal with are uncomfortable, and become the unthinkable or the disgusting. Shoulders are turned, and ears are tuned into something else. It’s easier to avoid telling others about the feeling when a person sees reluctance in the eyes of their audience. Telling uncomfortable incidences is like sharing secrets. No one really wants to tell them that! What would they think of the teller? So don’t tell lives on. Too many hold those precious moments inside, and refuse to find room in their heads or hearts to store them. They go untold, un-whispered and unmentioned until they overflow and spill out at the most unexpected and inconvenient of times.

Don’t ask, don’t tell has potentially terrible consequences. Most adult problems lead back, and begin early in life. When people hide personal issues, they are usually declared as dirty laundry. Mental stress tends to disintegrate over time, and gradually forms an anxiety that will only get worse with age. It's not a good idea to push the art of asking or telling. A void is created when no one answers questions we may want to ask. It never leaves on its own, sadly it stays in mind and in some cases permeates and gets ugly.

Love is great if you know how to share and give it. Hugs are rewarding if they are meant and given with sincerity. Peace is a creation, a state of mind. We aren’t angry when we're born. We come into life with expectations, and in many cases those are slowly peeled away. Learning and listening are gifts that can be taught early if we know how to teach others how to learn, to listen and the true meaning of love and respect. Honesty and truth are also a state of mind. We watch others lie, cheat and steal and get away with it. Some even become extremely successful doing unto others what they would never do to themselves. It’s hard to turn that around and justify why a youngster should do the opposite and accomplish something right, honest and good.

One way or the other, we, all of us, need to get over it. We need to ask and tell and force others to do the right thing. It may be hard when there is a bias everywhere. People disagree. The news can be one sided. Lies can come from places we once respected. It’s hard to justify why it’s okay for a politician to lie and then later preach the complete opposite. There are laws written badly, decisions made by important people and activated because people were afraid to ask and tell their opinions. We need to stop the practice of believing everything we hear because someone said it was good or okay. We need to question, wonder and insist it be done right.

We need to ask more questions, tell more stories and reach out and seek ideas from those disagreed with. We have forgotten how to compromise, tell the truth and expect others to do the same to us, and we would do to them. We have forgotten how to reach out and help a stranger, listen to a child and hear someone from another culture, nation or ethnic background describe the differences that exist and then work together for ways to improve them. Listening is an art, and we need to learn how to master this art, improve it, and justify what is heard and taught. More importantly we need to find ways to get along, and live with one another in a very complicated world.

William Byron Hillman © 2013
Book Links:
Veronique and Murray: http://tinyurl.com/8xrmmu7
Zebra’s Rock and Me http://tinyurl.com/7b28qu6
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ANVNQ6G
In development Veronique and Murray’s Honeymoon

Rollie Kemp Books
Ghosts and Phantoms Part I: http://tinyurl.com/6wxef7g
Ghosts and Phantoms Part II: http://tinyurl.com/d7mtspu
In editorial – Prematurely Terminated

My next film:
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure
Facebook http://www.facebook.com/She.2guy

Monday, October 14, 2013

MAKING A MOVIE


MAKING A MOVIE

It’s fun, and a significant challenge to put a movie together. The first thing you want to do is decide what kind of movie to make. By that, I mean, an action film, comedy, family venture or violent murder mystery.

I had the pleasure of making all of the above. As a filmmaker, you want to have fun doing what you love, but realize you also have an audience to please. People love movies, kids love them almost on an equal basis, and I love to make them, view and own them.

Of all the films I’ve directed or worked on in some capacity, the most rewarding has come from making family films. I’ve enjoyed every minute on the set, in the planning and after the films were released. I love working with kids, animals and stunt performers. Oh, I like the actors too, they’re just fairly serious where kids are open to try, listen and give from the heart. For the most part, the kids behave. As for the animals, I’ve never met one I didn’t like. I’ve shot with pigs, cows, horses, miniature horses, rabbits, skunks, cats and of course dogs. Dogs are my favorite. We need to add, of course, it helps enormously if you have great trainers to come along with the animals.

As a filmmaker, we depend on receiving residuals for our work. Most of the time you make a good salary when a film is made. After the movie is completed, you wait, and hope to go back to work on another film. In-between the movie jobs, you survive on residuals. A residual is a filmmaker royalty. Honest distribution means you get residuals, and sometimes they come out of the blue. Residuals are always welcomed, and usually occur at times you really need them. Not all filmmakers managed to find steady work. Sporadic income puts importance to reliable reporting and receiving residuals. The additional income from the royalty becomes part of our lives.

A few years ago I was asked to do an independent study on how various films did. I researched my own films along with many other filmmaker projects. I looked at G to R rated motion pictures made at studios and by independents. Some were very successful and others not so. I asked a lot of questions and got a few who reluctantly shared information with me, some refused, and some got mad. The effect was independent films paid better residuals than major studios. I guess you can equate that with a major publisher who dares to take good care of their writers as opposed to self-published books where the writer gets an honest share of all his sales. I was amazed how many so-so films actually made money, returned a profit and paid residuals.

When I separated the superstars from the rest of the crowd, it became an exciting study. You are not part of the majority if you are well paid up front. Most independent filmmakers get by with a very thin wallet, get paid little during production, and then wait for the residuals. Few own a piece of the film and an even fewer number actually make money from their ownership.

I am among many who have received a residual check for one cent. Yes, you read it correctly, $.01, and sadly its happened on more than one occasion. All of these tiny checks came from a major studio and/or network projects. The independent companies I have worked for paid more often, paid better, and thus it became obvious for the reasons most stayed in business. If they treated the filmmaker fairly, he’d most likely bring them another project. If they were cheated or felt they got the short end f the stick, they took their next movie projects elsewhere.

Checking over the rest of a fairly large pool of filmmakers, it became apparent what made money and what didn’t. What films had the longest shelf life and what kind of films disappeared after a few months of their release.

As for long shelf life, the most rewarding films were all family films. Without a doubt, family films were the core breadwinners at the box office. More importantly, nearly all had a G or PG rating. Many of these family films had been around for twenty or thirty years and in some cases much longer than that.

I realized I had the same results when I took a look at all my films. While I have produced and directed R rated projects that did exceedingly well at the box office and later on home video, all have disappeared from distribution after a few years and you can’t find a copy to rent anywhere. People have to search to find older PG-13 or R rated films. The most popular sites to find older films are either eBay or Amazon, and you have to buy them. They were long out of the rental boxes. The G and PG films, on the other hand, are still available at Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Target, K-Mart, Sears and many other retail outlets.

The G rated films I have produced and directed are still in distribution, and all of them have returned more in residuals than all the other projects I have done combined.

The bottom line when making a movie, think about the audience, your long-term goal, and the story content. Think about what pushes your hot button as the excitement you have in your heart bleeds comfortably into the movie you create. If you’re the writer, your story sparkles when touched by your heartstrings and this can be a thriller, comedy or action adventure.

My passion is not your passion. A movie is not a novel. You don’t have the opportunity to go into detailed development with character or location. You have to get to the point and in most cases do it quickly. The scenes need to flow seamlessly. The characters need to be multidimensional, exciting and alive. They need to feel, hurt and share emotions. The beginning, as one of my mentors preached to me over and over, was to begin with a bang. That’s not to say you need an explosion, a murder or accident. It says the story must have legs the moment it opens. A love story requires feelings, an action piece some excitement, and those who dare to make an adventure should start with one.

Making a movie has many moving parts. It all starts with a script. The story needs to grab the reader and suck him or her into the page and keep them there. You can have rises and tumbles, but you can’t leave the basic story for a second. You have no time for that. It’s a movie, and that means the story moves with lightening speed from one minute to the next. In the end, you want the audience to feel out of breath, as though they had just run a 10K. You want them to bounce from the theatre wanting more. If they question the plot, is it in a good way? If they missed something, will they come back for a second look?

Once the script is so tight it squeaks, you move on to casting and fund raising. Then comes the crew, special effects, locations and who plans to do what. When that’s over, you look to the editor to save you and use every piece you shot to protect the film and the gaps that suddenly raise their ugly head unexpectedly. You add the magic of sound, mix it together with the dialogue and then create a music score that blows you away. That doesn’t mean loud obnoxious music – it means to piece a score together that makes every scene in your film dance.

In the end, you screen your masterpiece and hope the audience loves it. Right after the screen opens you’ll know from their reaction. You might hear an “Awe” or a “gasp”. People breathe, take deep breaths or move closer to the screen. It’s a great experience to sit in the back of the theatre and watch reactions.

There is nothing that can duplicate the feeling of watching your movie come to life in front of an audience that loves what they see. There is madness to making a movie, loving the process and enjoying the outcome. Thus, the reason I make movies. I enjoy writing the script, arguing over words, scenes and characters. I thrill with producing and bringing all the moving parts together, and lastly I thoroughly become engrossed in directing and bringing all the selected pieces into one finely tuned event – a movie.

Making a movie is like the construction business only ten times more thrilling. If you buy a lot and build a building – that’s it. You can rent it, occupy it or sell it. In the end, it’s just a building.  When you make a movie, it breathes, moves, lives and lasts a lifetime. The backer feels a pulse, an accomplishment not felt in any other business. The audience, the press and the thrill of seeing his name on the film reward the backer. If it’s a great film, it will live the way beyond your wildest dreams. It will be talked about, written about, reviewed, screened and travel the world.  A building sits and gets old and out of date, but a movie lives on and a great film can survive in perpetuity.

William Byron Hillman © 2013
Book Links:
Veronique and Murray: http://tinyurl.com/8xrmmu7
Zebra’s Rock and Me http://tinyurl.com/7b28qu6
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ANVNQ6G

Rollie Kemp Books
Ghosts and Phantoms Part I: http://tinyurl.com/6wxef7g
Ghosts and Phantoms Part II: http://tinyurl.com/d7mtspu
My next film:
Quigley’s Christmas Adventure
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